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Blog


Taking Care of Your Dog’s Paws

Your four-legged friend’s feet play an important role in his daily life. They provide insulation to keep him warm in cold temperatures, contain sweat glands to cool him off in the heat, absorb shock, provide traction and balance, bear the majority of his weight, and allow him to run to greet you at the end of a long day.

Unfortunately, this means they also endure a lot of wear and tear. Watch out for these paw problems—and catch any issues early by regularly checking your dog’s digits.


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Tummy Trouble: Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Dogs and Cats

Is it a simple stomachache—or something more serious? While some causes of gastrointestinal upset in dogs and cats can be easily explained by dietary indiscretion (like rummaging through the trash), a bout with intestinal parasites, or even a change in food, others aren’t so clear.

If you just can’t seem to get your pet’s tummy trouble under control, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the culprit. A thorough workup with your veterinarian can help narrow down the issue and get your pet’s digestive health back on track.


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Caring for a Cat with Asthma

You startle awake in the middle of the night to a familiar hacking sound. It’s your cat, expelling a hairball again—or is it?

As a cat owner, you are no stranger to the occasional hairball or vomiting episode, but if your feline friend is frequently coughing, wheezing, or gagging, don’t write it off. What may be overlooked as a normal cat behavior could actually be a sign of asthma.

What Is Feline Asthma?

Similar to human asthma, feline asthma refers to chronic inflammation of the lungs.


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7 New Year’s Resolutions for You and Your Pet

Working on a resolution or two for a happier, healthier new year? Consider including some for your pet!

Setting and conquering goals together is a great way to bond with your pet and pick up some mutually beneficial habits. Need some inspiration to get started? Here are seven New Year’s resolutions for you and your pet.


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6 Hidden Signs of Great Veterinary Care

When it’s time to visit the veterinarian, you have a general idea of what to expect: Your pet will receive a nose-to-tail examination and your family veterinarian may recommend vaccines, lab tests, or flea control. There’s much more to your pet’s visit than meets the eye, however. Here are six hard-to-spot signs of excellent care to watch for next time you make a trip to the veterinary hospital.


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What Is Fluid Therapy?

You know when you are dehydrated—dry skin, decreased urination, and increased thirst are all signs your body needs more water. But how can you be sure your pet is getting enough fluids?

Like you, more than half of your dog or cat's body weight is made up of water. Hydration is essential to keep the body functioning properly, and when that water is lost, it must be restored. Fluid therapy replaces or maintains fluids within the bloodstream and body systems to help balance and support normal body function.


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Home for the Holidays: Your New-Pet Checklist

Did you bring home a new pet for the holidays? Welcoming a furry member to the family is an exciting time, and it can be easy to forget a few simple but important steps to ensure life with your new dog or cat begins on the right paw.

Get a head start on a happy, healthy life together with these tips.

Visit Your Veterinarian ASAP

If you’ve adopted your new pet from a shelter, chances are he has already been vaccinated, neutered, and microchipped—but it’s still important to follow up with a visit to your veterinarian.


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Saying Goodbye: Helping You and Your Pet Through the End of Life

Pets are an important part of our lives and play a special role in our families, so when it comes time to say goodbye to a beloved dog or cat, the coping process can be a difficult and overwhelming one—but you don’t have to navigate it alone. Your family veterinarian can help guide you through the process and ensure that the end of your pet’s life is as comfortable and peaceful as possible.


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