South Specialty
512-900-2778512-900-2778
South Emergency:
512-580-9233
South Emergency:
512-580-9233

North Specialty
512-900-2778512-900-2778
North Emergency:
512-580-8915
North Emergency:
512-580-8915

Round Rock Specialty
512-900-2778512-900-2778
Round Rock Emergency:
512-982-0535
Round Rock Emergency:
512-982-0535
Call Us

Cat Illness & Disease

This collection of Cat Illness & Disease articles has been curated for you by Central Texas Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Hospital. If you would like to talk to a veterinarian, please give us a call at (512) 900-2778.

What is Giardia?

It’s possible you’re not familiar with this nasty parasite or think it’s limited to foreign countries. However, giardia is a common intestinal parasite throughout the U.S. as well as abroad. Mud puddles, unclean rivers, even contaminated grass can all spread this infection.


Read More

What is Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)?

If you’ve ever owned (or been owned by!) a cat, chances are you’ve heard the acronym “FIV.” You know this is something your family veterinary team talks with you about during your cat’s wellness visits and preventive care planning, and it probably helps your understanding to liken the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) to the AIDS virus in humans because of their similarities. Now, let’s look even deeper into FIV, your cat’s risk, and treatment for infection:


Read More

What Is Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD)?

Is your cat urinating outside the litter box? Don’t get mad—get him to the vet!

Feline lower urinary tract disease, also known as feline urologic syndrome (FUS) or feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC), is a general term for a variety of conditions affecting the bladder and urethra.


Read More

Tummy Trouble: Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Dogs and Cats

Is it a simple stomachache—or something more serious? While some causes of gastrointestinal upset in dogs and cats can be easily explained by dietary indiscretion (like rummaging through the trash), a bout with intestinal parasites, or even a change in food, others aren’t so clear.

If you just can’t seem to get your pet’s tummy trouble under control, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the culprit. A thorough workup with your veterinarian can help narrow down the issue and get your pet’s digestive health back on track.


Read More

Caring for a Cat with Asthma

You startle awake in the middle of the night to a familiar hacking sound. It’s your cat, expelling a hairball again—or is it?

As a cat owner, you are no stranger to the occasional hairball or vomiting episode, but if your feline friend is frequently coughing, wheezing, or gagging, don’t write it off. What may be overlooked as a normal cat behavior could actually be a sign of asthma.

What Is Feline Asthma?

Similar to human asthma, feline asthma refers to chronic inflammation of the lungs.


Read More

What to Do When Your Pet Won’t Eat

When your pet suddenly loses his appetite, it can be concerning—particularly if you’ve got a regular chowhound on your hands. Reluctance to eat, also called inappetence or anorexia, can be caused by a number of serious conditions, so if you notice your dog or cat has lost interest in food, it’s best to contact your family veterinarian to get to the heart of the problem right away.


Read More

Big Heart, Big Problem: Understanding Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Does your cat have a big heart? No, we’re not talking about her loving personality. An enlarged heart could point to a cardiac condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy—and it can mean big problems for your feline friend’s health.

What is Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

Cardiomyopathy is a big word that simply means “disease of the heart muscle.” While there are many different types of heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is by far the most commonly diagnosed cardiac problem in cats.


Read More

Reasons Your Cat May Be Meowing So Much

Have you ever encountered a “chatty” kitty? One who meowed at every opportunity (and then some)? Or maybe you’ve had the experience of a kitty who was mostly quiet, but then something happened and he became extremely “meowy.”

Truth is, like people, some cats are simply more vocal than others. They may meow to let you know they’re there. They meow because they want something to eat, or they want to say “hello.” Whatever the reason, a chatty kitty is nothing to worry about unless it’s due to a behavior change.


Read More
Subscribe to RSS - Cat Illness & Disease