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Round Rock Emergency:
(512) 892-9038
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(512) 892-9038
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XAttention:We are open! CTVSEH is here for you all day, everyday, even when times are tough. Read about the measures we are taking in our practice for you, your pet, and our safety.Read More

Dog Illness & Disease


This collection of Dog Illness & Disease articles has been curated for you by Central Texas Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Hospital. If you would like to talk to a veterinarian, please give us a call at (512) 892-9038.

How to Easily Care For Your Diabetic Pet At Home

So your pet’s been diagnosed with diabetes. Don’t panic! As veterinarians, we understand how distressing this diagnosis can be but, with proper treatment, exercise, nutrition, and monitoring, your pet can still lead a long, happy, and primarily healthy life. It does take commitment on your part as the pet parent, however, so we want you to pass along to you as much information as possible to make sure the treatment of your diabetic pet does as smoothly and stress-free as possible.


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Pet Poison Prevention Week: Spring Flowers, Cleaning, and Other Toxic Items For Cats and Dogs

Pet Poison Prevention Week is approaching, running from March 20th - 26th. This week focuses on educating pet parents on some of the common things poisonous to pets. Pet poison prevention week ties into National Poison Prevention Week and the many dangers that spring, although a lovely season, brings with it. As veterinarians, we are grateful to have this opportunity to remind everyone about the hazards found in spring, such as cleaners, plants, fertilizer, pesticides, and so much more. The ASPCA lists many plants, household items, and food that can be lethal to pets.


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Pet Diabetes Facts to Know to Keep Your Cat or Dog Healthy

November is National Diabetes Month and, although this originally began as an awareness day for humans who are stricken with this endocrine disease, it has evolved into National Pet Diabetes Month as well. As veterinarians, we’re all for more awareness about this disease, as many people don’t realize how prevalent it is. In fact, 1 in every 200 cats will get it in their lifetime!


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Parvo in Pups: Risks, Prevention, Spread and Why It's Spiked During the Pandemic

If you’ve ever had a puppy, the term “parvo”—short for parvovirus—is surely enough to send shivers down your spine. This extremely contagious virus is known for taking a previously healthy puppy that was showering you with smelly puppy breath kisses and playing one day to nearly or actually fatally ill in a matter of days. Thankfully, this disease in dogs is preventable and somewhat treatable if caught early, so we’ve taken the time in this article to share all the signs, risks, and ways to prevent this horrifying virus.


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How to Know Whether Your Pet Is Nearing the End of Life

If you’ve ever had a dog or cat who has lived with you for many years, you know that they undoubtedly become a member of your family. So when you notice them slowing down or, worse, showing signs of pain, you might wonder whether your precious pet is nearing the end. And while we know this is the last thing you want to face as a pet owner, we all also realize that it’s an inevitable part of opening our hearts and homes to these wonderful animals.


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How to Avoid The Dangers of Harmful Algal Blooms To Your Dogs

As the beaches, lakes, and other recreational areas begin to reopen, many of us will be venturing into the outdoors as the summer season approaches. However, reports of increasing occurrences of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in bodies of water across the United States pose a great risk for both you and your pet. If you plan on getting out and getting your dog some exercise around bodies of water, paying attention to these reports is crucial to dog wellness. 


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Pets and the Novel Coronavirus

When the current outbreak of novel coronavirus disease, or COVID-19, first came to light in December 2019, researchers indicated that animals were the likely source of the virus. So people are naturally asking, "Can my pet contract and transmit this virus?" That question has become even more valid after one dog - the pet of an infected owner in Hong Kong - recently tested "weak positive" for the virus.


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What is a Heart Murmur?

When your dog or cat visits the veterinarian, the doctor will use a stethoscope to listen to the heart. While a regular heartbeat has a certain rhythm, an irregular heartbeat breaks that rhythm either with an extra beat or two, or a “whooshing” sound.

An irregular heartbeat or unusual sound could mean your pet has a heart murmur.


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